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Information at BRLSI

The Bath Literary and Scientific Institution (the 'Royal' part came later) was founded in 1824, but was a direct descendant of Bath societies going back to the 1770s. Our first home was a purpose-built building near Bath Abbey which made way for a 20th-Century road scheme, and we now live in Queen Square, on a site originally the home of Dr William Oliver, inventor of the Bath Oliver biscuit and a key figure in Bath's early 18th-Century development.

Volunteers

VolunteersVolunteers

BRLSI welcomes volunteers with a variety of different skills and interests.

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Staff

BRLSI Staff

As well as the volunteers, the BRLSI has a small team of paid staff who work full time in the admin office. 

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Adopt-a-Book

Adopt-a-Book scheme

BRLSI relies on members' and visitors' financial support to help conserve and restore its historic library.

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Contact Us

Contact Us

You can contact the BRLSI in several different ways - phone, mail, email, Facebook, Twitter

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History

History of the BRLSI

The Bath Literary and Scientific Institution (the 'Royal' part came later) was founded in 1824, but was a direct descendant of Bath societies going back to the 1770s.

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Did you know...

Only twelve guineas.

The paintings by Andrea Casali were originally for Beckford's Fonthill Splendens in Dorset. We bought them for twelve guineas!

Curatorial Curiosities

Early reconstruction of a Labyrinthodon

Early reconstruction of a Labyrinthodont: This is mid-19th Century, 1:30 scale model, designed by Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins to be reproduced life size for the grounds of Crystal Palace. This reconstruction assumed it leapt like a frog and was based only on fragments of jaw and teeth. The Labyrinthodontia are a diverse subclass of amphibians, common between about 390 to 210 million years ago. They evolved to fill many adaptive niches occupied by mammals and reptiles today.